Near the end . . .

So, are you one of those who, when you approach the end of a novel, stretch it out as much as possible?  Or once you’re within reach, do you greedily drive forward to the last page.

I’m pretty much a drive to the last page sort of reader.  If I’m 30 pages away and it’s midnight, I’ll sit in my wife’s make-up chair in the bathroom and finish.  Kate, on the other hand, is a “oh, no!  I’m not ready for this book to end” kind of reader.

I guess, when it comes right down to it, it depends on the book.

One of the characteristics of a serialized book is that you don’t have the luxury of driving through to the end.  You could read a couple of paragraphs a day of the last chapter and make it stretch out if you wanted to, but it doesn’t really lend itself to that treatment either.

Fear not: it’ll be available as a complete work before you know it.  I have a few dozen comments to incorporate and then off to my proofreader to catch the last few bugs.  “Few” being an exaggeration; there are at least a couple of hundred, and Stephanie will lovingly point out them all.

Just a last few loose ends remain to be tied up.

Tomorrow . . .

book-the-end

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8 thoughts on “Near the end . . .

  1. I’m a drive through to the end of the book. I’ve gotta know how it’s going to end, who ends up with who and how the characters are going to finish. Once I was reading a book and lacked just a few pages, ok maybe more than just a few, but couldn’t finish reading and work, so I downloaded the audio book so I could listen to the last chapter while I was working and finish the book. It was one of those tear jerker kind of ending, so I’m working at my desk crying, good thing I work from home and no one noticed…:)

  2. Telling more secrets, Mr. Rhoad? At least you didn’t share that I ALWAYS read the end of the book once I know the characters well enough to care. Except with your books, of course. It drives me crazy not knowing where they are headed. The fact that you don’t exactly know where they are headed doesn’t help matters.

  3. I’m a cross between Kate and Rusty. Sometimes dragging out those last few pages to savor, sometimes racing through. But I’m also an ending re-reader. When an author gets it right–think The Great Gatsby here, for example–I’ll re-read the ending. More than once. “Wallow” as in “to live self-indulgently; luxuriate; revel” might be a good word for it.

    On my current quest to read 500 romances–and I am a LONG way from that goal–I’ve noticed that the endings are often weak, then made worse by the current trend of tacking on an epilogue to wrap up the loose ends that should have been wrapped in the book or left to dangle in an uncertain future. But the ending of Wait for You (by J Lynn aka Jennifer Armentrout) was lovely, triggering a re-read of the last chapter. Then a re-read of the last six chapters. Then with an ah-hell, I just re-read the whole book.

    So it’s not always clear in my reading life when I’ve gotten to The End.

    • Just finished a book last night by an author I like. Met my expectations. Until. A botched–disappointing, saggy, undeserved HEA–ending.

      Definitely has me re-thinking my envisioned ending for WIP.

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